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Re: [Supertraining] Training the transverse plane vs Saggital only? CONCEPT LOCK JRTELLE Mon Aug 25 03:00:56 2008

In a message dated 8/23/08 11:00:37 AM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:


> Let me ask you this:
> We might think of a woodchop as being more vertical translation in total,
> but at key joints would you agree that there is significant rotation at the
> hips and or thoracic - this is to say, the total is vertical, but the angular
> rotation at the hips  (horizontal translation makes me think of frontal or
> saggital plane but not particularly the rotation factor) is such that it at 
> least
> deems necessary attention? 
>
> Not to say that it should be trained to the exclusion of other planes, but
> that it needs to be integrated such that it becomes a significant player in
> key exercises (other than a woodchop).
>

Hi Jamie,

What I was trying to say, but didn't very well, was that in the wood chop
there is a stronger vertical resisted component than horizontal. The translation
was meant to refer to the horizontal translation of the center of gravity.

The wood chop horizontal rotation is not much resisted as it directly would
be if the cable pulley were at waist to shoulder height.

"this is to say, the total is vertical, but the angular rotation at the hips
--- is such that it at least deems necessary attention?" ABSOLUTELY At the
risk of redundancy horizontal�hip rotation is best addressed with resistance
perpendicular to hip rotation axis e.g., "the cable pulley were at waist to
shoulder height." Or medicine ball rotations, or? It might be fun to have any
inclined to submit their favorite hip rotation or rotation about the hip or I 
have
an exercise for both. I can't wait to have J Casler put the kinetic chain to
that one ;-}

Grins,

Jerry “themadscientist” Telle
Lakewood CO USA