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[Supertraining] Re: Low-Load High Volume vs High-Load Low Volume Resistance Exercise? carruthersjam Wed Mar 02 13:01:11 2011

Some key points from the study:

1.  They investigated protein synthesis: Low-Load High Volume Resistance 
Exercise Stimulates **Muscle Protein Synthesis** More Than High-Load Low Volume 
Resistance Exercise in Young Men.   No investigation concerning protein 
degradation or muscle hypertrophy.  It was speculated that the *acute* higher 
protein sysnthesis would lead to chronic hypertrophic adaptations.

2.  Volume was higher in the 30% 1RM group. + the intensities used could have 
been more varied.  Research data from Fry, Wernbom, Hetinger, Muller and more 
seems to suggest that maximal hypertrophy occurs with loads from 65-95% 1RM.

"However, it is important to recognize that ***acute scientific studies simply 
supply the framework on which to build future training studies upon to directly 
test if a cause-and-effect relationship does in fact exist***.

In conclusion, we have demonstrated that low-load high volume resistance 
exercise has a potent stimulatory effect on anabolic signalling molecules, MyoD 
and myogenin mRNA expression and muscle protein synthesis. Our results support 
previous findings that demonstrated after 16 weeks of isometric training at 30% 
maximal voluntary contraction that significant increases in fibre area can be 
achieved [52]. Although, the contraction type employed in the current study 
(i.e., dynamic) differed from Alway and colleagues [52] (i.e., isometic), our 
data provides further support that low-load contractions performed with 
numerous repetitions or high-load contractions performed for fewer repetitions 
will result in similar training induced gains in muscle hypertrophy as 
previously suggested [52], or even superior gains, as results from the current 
study would predict. This premise is further supported by data which 
demonstrates that short-term changes in muscle protein synthesis [1], [2] are 
predictive of training induced gains in muscle mass [3], [4]; however, a 
training study in which these distinctly different exercise loads (90FAIL and 
30FAIL) are utilized is clearly warranted to confirm **our speculation**."

Jamie Carruthers
Wakefield, UK


--- In [EMAIL PROTECTED], [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
>
> I've always suspected you could do practically anything to untrained men and 
> they'd gain SOMETHING. <grin>
>
>
> Especially if you hand pick the ones who look like they could walk across a 
> room and gain muscle...!
>
>
> I'd be far more impressed if they chose untrained women. Harder group to 
> train up anyway? :)
>
>
> The Phantom
> aka Linda Schaefer, CMT/RMT, competing powerlifter
> Denver, Colorado, USA
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "steve" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
> Sent: Tuesday, March 1, 2011 8:10:21 PM
> Subject: [Supertraining] Re: Low-Load High Volume vs High-Load Low Volume 
> Resistance Exercise?
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From this study it appears to suggest that 30% load to failure will induce 
> greater hypertrophy than 90% load to failure.
>
> Am i reading this right?
>
> If so surely the parameters of the study were not quite right i.e using 
> untrained men
>
> Steve Max
> Sydney, Australia
>
> --- In [EMAIL PROTECTED] , "carruthersjam" <Carruthersjam@> wrote:
> >
> > Low-Load High Volume Resistance Exercise Stimulates Muscle Protein 
> > Synthesis More Than High-Load Low Volume Resistance Exercise in Young Men
> >
> > Nicholas A. Burd1, Daniel W. D. West1, Aaron W. Staples1, Philip J. 
> > Atherton2, Jeff M. Baker1, Daniel R. Moore1, Andrew M. Holwerda1, Gianni 
> > Parise1,3, Michael J. Rennie2, Steven K. Baker4, Stuart M. Phillips1*
> >
> > http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0012033
> >
> > Abstract Top
> > Background
> > We aimed to determine the effect of resistance exercise intensity (% 1 
> > repetition maximumâ€"1RM) and volume on muscle protein synthesis, anabolic 
> > signaling, and myogenic gene expression.
> >
> > Methodology/Principal Findings
> > Fifteen men (21±1 years; BMI = 24.1±0.8 kg/m2) performed 4 sets of 
> > unilateral leg extension exercise at different exercise loads and/or 
> > volumes: 90% of repetition maximum (1RM) until volitional failure (90FAIL), 
> > 30% 1RM work-matched to 90%FAIL (30WM), or 30% 1RM performed until 
> > volitional failure (30FAIL). Infusion of [ring-13C6] phenylalanine with 
> > biopsies was used to measure rates of mixed (MIX), myofibrillar (MYO), and 
> > sarcoplasmic (SARC) protein synthesis at rest, and 4 h and 24 h after 
> > exercise. Exercise at 30WM induced a significant increase above rest in MIX 
> > (121%) and MYO (87%) protein synthesis at 4 h post-exercise and but at 24 h 
> > in the MIX only. The increase in the rate of protein synthesis in MIX and 
> > MYO at 4 h post-exercise with 90FAIL and 30FAIL was greater than 30WM, with 
> > no difference between these conditions; however, MYO remained elevated 
> > (199%) above rest at 24 h only in 30FAIL. There was a significant increase 
> > in AktSer473 at 24h in all conditions (P = 0.023) and mTORSer2448 
> > phosphorylation at 4 h post-exercise (P = 0.025). Phosporylation of 
> > Erk1/2Tyr202/204, p70S6KThr389, and 4E-BP1Thr37/46 increased significantly 
> > (P<0.05) only in the 30FAIL condition at 4 h post-exercise, whereas, 
> > 4E-BP1Thr37/46 phosphorylation was greater 24 h after exercise than at rest 
> > in both 90FAIL (237%) and 30FAIL (312%) conditions. Pax7 mRNA expression 
> > increased at 24 h post-exercise (P = 0.02) regardless of condition. The 
> > mRNA expression of MyoD and myogenin were consistently elevated in the 
> > 30FAIL condition.
> >
> > Conclusions/Significance
> > These results suggest that low-load high volume resistance exercise is more 
> > effective in inducing acute muscle anabolism than high-load low volume or 
> > work matched resistance exercise modes.
> >
> > We report for the first time that low-load high volume resistance exercise 
> > (30FAIL) is more effective at increasing muscle protein synthesis than 
> > high-load low volume resistance exercise (90FAIL). Specifically, the 30FAIL 
> > protocol induced similar increases in MYO protein synthesis to that induced 
> > by the 90FAIL protocol at 4 h post-exercise but this response was sustained 
> > at 24 h only in 30FAIL. Furthermore, the MYO response in 30WM are in 
> > agreement with those of Kumar and colleagues [6] who demonstrated a 
> > dose-dependent relationship of exercise-load when volume (i.e., external 
> > workâ€"expressed as repetitions×load) is equalized. In contrast to 
> > recommendations [31], that heavy loads (i.e., high intensity) are necessary 
> > to optimally stimulate MYO protein synthesis, it is now apparent that the 
> > extent of MYO protein synthesis after resistance exercise is not entirely 
> > load dependent, but appears to be related to exercise volume and, we 
> > speculate, to muscle fibre activation and most likely to the extent of type 
> > II fibre recruitment.
> >
> > These results do agree with previous suggestions [31], [32], that the 
> > duration of the MYO response may be determined by exercise volume at 
> > extended time points beyond the exercise bout. It is worth highlighting, 
> > however, the early amplitude of MYO protein synthesis is dependent on 
> > contraction intensity as indicated by a greater response of muscle protein 
> > synthesis in the 90FAIL and 30WM conditions (Fig. 1b). This suggests that 
> > the volume of exercise, which we view as being related to the degree of 
> > fibre activation affects the duration and intensity affects the acute 
> > amplitude of the MYO response.
> >
> > In conclusion, we have demonstrated that low-load high volume resistance 
> > exercise has a potent stimulatory effect on anabolic signalling molecules, 
> > MyoD and myogenin mRNA expression and muscle protein synthesis. Our results 
> > support previous findings that demonstrated after 16 weeks of isometric 
> > training at 30% maximal voluntary contraction that significant increases in 
> > fibre area can be achieved [52]. Although, the contraction type employed in 
> > the current study (i.e., dynamic) differed from Alway and colleagues [52] 
> > (i.e., isometic), our data provides further support that low-load 
> > contractions performed with numerous repetitions or high-load contractions 
> > performed for fewer repetitions will result in similar training induced 
> > gains in muscle hypertrophy as previously suggested [52], or even superior 
> > gains, as results from the current study would predict. This premise is 
> > further supported by data which demonstrates that short-term changes in 
> > muscle protein synthesis [1], [2] are predictive of training induced gains 
> > in muscle mass [3], [4]; however, a training study in which these 
> > distinctly different exercise loads (90FAIL and 30FAIL) are utilized is 
> > clearly warranted to confirm our speculation.
> >
> > ==================
> > Jamie Carruthers
> > Wakefield, UK
> >
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>