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RE: bcintbird-pics grosbeak identification Rick Howie Mon Feb 20 17:01:08 2012

High again Phil. It is a curious phenomenon in that by the time this bird
had moulted in all of those red feathers, the rump feathering should have
followed suit as the molt is normally complete. It appears as if there can
be aberrant individuals whereby some feathers forgot to fly away and make
room for the new inbound ones. A constant reminder that nature retains the
right to variation for whatever reasons and purposes. 'tis perhaps only
humans that make rules and then expect everybody and everything to obey
them.

 

Perhaps Barry can enucleate the reason for such variation which we shall
entitle " Lancaster's Molt Parable." 

 

Rick Howie  

 

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Phil Ranson
Sent: February-20-12 1:54 PM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: bcintbird-pics grosbeak identification

 

I haven't been following the particulars of this discussion, but thought I'd
throw in a recently taken photo by Rod Sargent at Baker Creek west of
Quesnel. He was intrigued by the mustard rump on an otherwise typical adult
male plumage. 

 

Phil Ranson

Williams Lake

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