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Re: [Geowanking] Where has all the geowanking gone ? - topic for discussion Andrew Turner Thu Feb 02 05:01:30 2012

On Fri, Jan 13, 2012 at 4:07 PM, Andrea Moed <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> As a consumer, or at least, someone not currently building the geo-web or
> other geo-systems, the question I'm hoping to see more about is, how broadly
> accessible can we make geospatial analysis? When will it be possible for a
> non-cartographer on their own to use maps, public geodata, and geo-indexed
> private/personal data to answer a question like "Where should I plant my
> garden?", "Where in the region should I live if I want to lower my carbon
> footprint?", "Where should our neighborhood advocate for adding a park, or a
> supermarket, or more beat cops?"... etc.

Well, there are definitely a few of us trying to tackle that
particular problem. ;)

However, this question has come up a few times in the past year or so.
I've attributed it to a few things. By my own mention, many of us that
started hacking on new things in the space ended up starting or
joining a business that migrated our time from pondering many new
ideas to executing a growing a single (or at least fewer) ideas. Not a
great reason, but more of a practical one.

The ideas that we were pondering but didn't tackle have somewhat been
'proven out' by others (location gaming, friend finding, photo
sharing). Consider Path, Color, FourSquare, Facebook Places, et al.
doing a bit of "sucking the air out of the room". They're no longer
interesting demonstrations or ponderings but active projects or
businesses and the discussions have fractured off to those channels or
just become an aspect of another discipline (e.g. "big data")

Probably somewhat because of the avenues of "what if" being narrowed
through actual implementation it's more difficult to broadly
pontificate unexplored territory.

Personally, things I wish I had more time to explore and just hack on
and would be interested to hear about follows somewhat with Jeffrey's
notes. Convergence of geolocated hardware + software. There is now a
preponderance of personal health devices showing up - why not the same
for Spimes/Motes/etc. Pachube is another community (besides Public
Labs) playing with this.

Andrew


>
> Thanks for starting the discussion!
>
> --Andrea
>
>
> On Fri, Jan 13, 2012 at 11:43 AM, William J. Spat <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>>
>> Mention of this list’s quietness got me to wondering why?
>>
>>
>>
>> My feeling is that good maps and 3d location data are in the process of
>> becoming commoditised, so there’s less about which to fantasize.
>>
>>
>>
>> I mean, three-dimensional spatial data is being built out to the point
>> that if it is a lasting visible structure, it’s going to be on the map.  And
>> we tend to fantasize about the unknown.  So what’s left about which to
>> geowank?
>>
>>
>>
>> I suppose there’s a historical dimension – putting Paxton’s crystal palace
>> back on the map and that kind of thing.
>>
>>
>>
>> One area that intrigues me – and probably because I know so little about
>> it -  is the mapping of non-spatial data.  I mean stuff that is associated
>> with a point or area, but is not itself three-dimensional in any meaningful
>> sense.
>>
>>
>>
>> For example, I once read of a riff on  forestry software used to predict
>> optimum snow conditions on ski hills.  So presumably inputs that were
>> relevant to tree growth (precipitation, sunlight, slope, and so on) were
>> mapped to conditions relevant to really good snow for sliding sports.  This
>> might be an example –and one that has been commercialised, at least in a
>> ski-hill consultancy.
>>
>>
>>
>> What else might there be?
>>
>>
>>
>> We have had wikis of crime scenes placed on maps (the crimes generally
>> having occurred at a location, but not having a lasting visible structure
>> {leaving aside architectural crimes ;-)}), and there are great wikis of
>> transient spatial activities (http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/ is a
>> favourite of mine)
>>
>>
>>
>> What else?
>>
>>
>>
>> I’ve fantasized about maps that input to policy decisions.  For example,
>> it’s a tired (pardon the pun) saw that cyclists systematically disobey
>> traffic rules.  To which, as a cyclist,  I counter that the number of
>> infractions by motorists far exceeds those by cyclists since disregard for
>> speed limits by motorists is endemic.  Could we map those areas of excessive
>> speed as we have live maps of congestion?  Pinpoint potential profit centres
>> for Treasury?
>>
>>
>>
>> I supposed the challenge is (as it was in the early days of this list)
>> getting good data.  For example, I read that one good argument for the
>> establishment of marine parks came from records of large fish catches after
>> an exclusion zone was established for the moon shots at Cape Canaveral.
>>
>>
>>
>> And even if good data can be found and geocoded, it is not really ‘geo,’
>> so perhaps harder to manage with our systems and approaches?
>>
>>
>>
>> As smartphones get more sensors, perhaps we can get them to harvest more
>> data?  Or just tap into more silos of data that are already there, but not
>> adequately mapped?  As we have all been turned into wardrivers by Apple and
>> their ilk?
>>
>>
>>
>> I  am reminded of a short story from Peter Carey’s “Fat Man in history”.
>> But that’s another topic for discussion….
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
>> [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Anselm Hook
>> Sent: 12-Jan-12 09:20
>> To: S. E.
>> Cc: geowanking
>> Subject: Re: [Geowanking] When and Where is WhereCamp SF/Bay Area?
>>
>>
>>
>> I'm not doing it this year but Steve C say's he'll pick it up - looking
>> forward to attending :-)
>>
>>
>>
>> a
>>
>> On Wed, Jan 11, 2012 at 2:00 PM, S. E. <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>>
>> I have not seen this posted and the list has been awful quiet (aside from
>> LinkedIn requests ;)
>>
>>
>>
>> O'Reilly's Where conference is 4/2-4, so I imagine it will be 3/31-4/1 or
>> 4/8-9, but would be great to know now for scheduling.
>>
>>
>>
>> Looking forward to it!
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steven Echtman
>>
>>
>>
>> HearPlanet
>>
>> www.HearPlanet.com
>>
>> iPhone Apps | Android Apps
>>
>>
>>
>> Ph/Fx: 415-324-8555
>>
>> Cl: 310-962-1021
>>
>> [EMAIL PROTECTED]
>>
>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> @anselm 415 215 4856 http://twitter.com/anselm
>>
>>
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>
>
>
> --
> Andrea Moed
> [EMAIL PROTECTED]
> http:www.linkedin.com/in/amoeda
> twitter: futuristparent
>
>
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-- 
Andrew Turner
mobile: 248.982.3609
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
http://highearthorbit.com

http://geocommons.com           Helping build the Geospatial Web
Introduction to Neogeography - http://oreilly.com/catalog/neogeography

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